Register Status Example
In this example, you might want to know how much traffic comes from your registered users versus people who are not yet registered. In case like this you might hard code the s.prop to “Not Registered” unless you determine that they are in fact registered, at which time you change the value to “Registered”. Then you will be able to see how much traffic comes from both segments.

  • s.prop3 = “Registered;
  • s.prop3 = “Unregistered”;
The key here is that you have to set the s.prop on every page, so you need to make sure that you have access to the information (register status) on every page so that you can set it into the s.prop. This may entail accessing a session variable or reading a cookie, etc.

This same principle could apply to other kinds of segments, such as membership type. If you have Gold, Silver and Bronze members of your site, you could have them log in, and then populate the s.prop on every page so that you know how much traffic is attributed to different member types. In the next section, you will also see that this will allow you to not only see how much traffic is coming from the segments, but also what content they are consuming, etc.

LIST PROP/DELIMITED PROP
There are situations where you want to capture many separate values from a single page, such as with an interest form that contains many check boxes to indicate many different interests, but don’t want to use multiple property variables. In these cases, the List Prop is very helpful.

This list prop is most commonly used with large lists of checks boxes where the user can choose many items from a list. Each item will increment as a separate line item. This allows you to pass in a large number of values through the same variable, but have the report separate them out into individual line items. In doing this, each checkbox gets incremented separately.

List Prop Example:
For example, let’s say you have a service on your site where visitors choose US States, There people come to your site and choose various states.
Choose States:
WA
OR
CA
NE
UT
Choose States:
WA
OR
CA
NE
UT
Choose States:
WA
OR
CA
NE
UT
If the s.prop was a “regular” s.prop, and you submitted the various selections, the report might look like this:

Regular s.prop
State
Page Views
WA, CA 1
WA, OR, CA 1
CA, NE, UT 1
This is not helpful, because you have to look at all the combinations of states just to see where one state was involved. On the other hand, if a prop is enabled as a list prop, the resultant report would look more like this:
List s.prop
State
Page Views
CA 3
WA 2
OR 1
NE 1
UT 1
This report is much more useful, because it splits the individual values out to their separate lines, instead of showing all the different combinations.